stand your ground

a little link love 2.20.14

1. i’m flabergasted that a florida jury allowed yet another man to murder a black teenager without a murder conviction.  i’m sickened by the constant reminder that the lives of black children are less important than those of their white counterparts.  watch as jessica williams of the daily show does a tongue and cheek run-down of white america’s omnipresent “fear goggles” that can make “four black teenagers taking a calculus test look like a scene from the wire.”

2.  yayadon’t you just love yaya alafia (nee dacosta)? i remember her season of america’s next top model and the way she schooled tyra banks on the origins of kente cloth.  the ivy league grad  is now an actress, wife and mother who was recently interviewed by michel martin on npr’s tell me more.  listen to her thoughts on her role in lee daniels’ the butler, colorism and why she calls herself an african in america.

3. have you heard the teaser to beyonce’s drunk in love remix featuring kanye?!?! it made me jump up and run around my apartment full speed — the only appropriate response when one of your favorite songs from beyonce’s new album gets better.

4.  it’s not every day that you hear an artist reference brandy, bun b, bounce music and kirk franklin as their inspirations.  in a recent interview with npr’s new r&b and hip hop show, microphone check, i fell in love with solange all over again as she rattled off a list of 90’s hip hop and r&b that only a person raised in the south can appreciate.

solange-losing-you

the day after

the day after an injustice you wake up and wonder if it was a dream.  you search your memory to recall the events from the day before.  you remember the news reports, the twitter feed, the facebook posts.  they all remind you of the verdict: not guilty. the day after an injustice you feel restless.  rally? prayer vigil? scream? no solution to mend a weary soul comes to mind.  the day after an injustice you go to church and wait for the pastor to deliver a message that will make sense of hundreds of years of oppression and violence, but it doesn’t come.  you walk around the city aimlessly, looking for something, anything to help numb the pain.  the day after an injustice you think about your grandparents and ancestors who experienced injustice with no retribution their entire lives.  you think about all the stories they told you about segregated schools, lynchings, white mobs and backbreaking labor and know that nothing has changed.  the day after an injustice you turn to your mentors, james and grace lee boggs, dorothy roberts and bell hooks to help explain this world.  the day after an injustice you feel the blow to your will to fight, but arrive at a renewed spirit to continue the struggle in the name of those who fought before you.  the day after an injustice you re-dedicate your life to ending inequity because that is the only reason you were born.

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rest peacefully dearest trayvon.  we will always remember.